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What kind of cup do you drink your cold brew, espresso, or hot coffee out of?

You decide to start your morning with your favorite B-Pod®, great choice! For most people, the next decision is a tough one, which cup to use. If your cup selection looks anything like mine, it’s a hodgepodge of different shapes, sizes and even levels of sentimental attachment. For years, I picked the mug that spoke most to my mood, but in recent times, I’ve started to give that more thought. Does what you drink your coffee out of impact the coffee itself. The knee jerk reaction might be no, but recent research is telling us otherwise.

Size Matters

Bigger is not always better. When it comes to selecting a coffee mug, think about your needs. If you’re drinking this at home and want to avoid having your coffee get cold, choose something on the smaller size, maybe 6-10 ounces, since you can refill as needed. If you’re on the go and need to get all your coffee into one vessel, maybe something a bit larger and insulated will do the trick. Think twice the next time you pick up that behemoth cup. Maybe it’s time to give the little guy some love.

Right Material

The material that a cup is made of should be a big consideration before you add one to your collection. The most common materials used for coffee cups are plastic, metal, glass or ceramic. Plastic cups will retain flavors in time, which will take away from your coffee experience. Metals like stainless steel will be the most durable and do well in the way of heat retention. Glass and ceramic are going to be the most fragile but also offer virtually no flavor or smell retention from past brews. It’s really a matter of personal preference and need, but if you’re drinking at home, I would lean towards ceramic or glass cup. If you’re on the go, metal is a nice option. Let’s leave the plastic for children’s toys.

Right Shape

This is a topic that has had a lot of chatter, but I’ll lay out the basics. If you really want the most aroma out of your coffee, tulip-shaped cups that are wider at the bottom and narrower on top are best in class. Cups with this shape also help with greater heat retention as there is less surface area on the top of the cup. For espresso-based milk drinks, like lattes, the preference will be for a squattier cup with a wide opening. This allows more room for the espresso and milk to mix and provide a great canvas space for some beautiful latte art. Standard diner mugs are still a good option for drinking filter coffee. While they might not be the best at retaining heat, sometimes quicker cooling is a preference. The major key to keep in mind is that whatever shape you decide on, you pick a cup that is similar in size to the total coffee you’re brewing.

Right Color

I’m not going to sit here and tell you what color mug you need, but there is some science that says color can actually impact what you taste in food. Certain colors, like pink and blue, lend to perceived sweetness, while other colors, like standard white, might lend to more perceived bitterness. The research on this is still rather new, so keep that in mind. Do your own experiment at home and brew the same coffee for guests in two different color cups. Maybe they will taste something different in each.

You Do You

Cups, mugs or vessels, it doesn’t matter what you call them, but whatever you drink your coffee out of is a highly personal choice. There is no right or wrong cup to use, but there might be times when a certain cup in your arsenal is a bit more appropriate. It just gives you one more thing to consider when making your morning coffee, whether it’s espresso, cold brew, hot coffee or iced coffee. I can say with confidence that it doesn’t matter what cup you use, if you’re filling it with Bruvi coffee from our single serve system, you’re doing something right!

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